Journalism in the digital era

Web and mobile platforms demand us to adopt a platform-neutral mindset for an all-inclusive production approach — create the digital contents first, then distribute via appropriate platforms. Digital-first strategy has been the buzzword lately as big-name media such as Financial Times announced that they are going digital-first.

Journalism in the digital era

Highlights from a talk at USC Annenberg: Disruptive Power Losing Control Losing Control outlines how in a wide range of international areas of influence, the state is being challenged by new, digitally enabled actors. Grounded in the theory of disruption, this chapter explores the rise and power of the activist collective Anonymous, the paradox of dual use surveillance technologies, and the recent revelation on the extent of NSA surveillance.

Journalism in the digital era

The chapter serves as an introduction to the book. Disruptive Power Disruptive Power traces the development of the modern state and drawing on disruption theory, explores how the introduction of digital technology presents a crisis to state power.

The state began as a mechanism for centralizing and exercising power and over time became hierarchical, bureaucratic, and, in democratic states, accountable to the rule of law.

In a networked world, however, groups like Anonymous wield power by being decentralized, collaborative, and resilient. These two models of power are fundamentally at odds and the resulting disruptive power threatens the institutions that have preserved the balance of power since the end of World War II.

Spaces of Dissent Spaces of Dissent explores the rapidly evolving space of digital activism, or hacktivism, through the example of a group of hackers called Telecomix, who served as a form of tech support for the Arab Spring. Such cyber activists have taken on a role of social and cultural provocateurs; they are dissenting actors in a culture that is increasingly hostile to protest.

This argument is grounded in an exploration of hactivism as a form of civil disobedience, though one that looks markedly different, and is potential more powerful, than the placards and megaphones of old. The chapter details how the state has responded to the perceived threat of online civil disobedience through its prosecutions against Chelsea Manning and Anonymous, and argues that their excessiveness stems form a paranoia over losing control.

Finally, it explores the costs to society when we eliminate social deviancy. New Money New Money details how the rise of crypto-currencies such as Bitcoin represent a threat to the power the state derives from the control of currency. This chapter first outlines the history of the close connection between the control of currency and state power.

It then details the rise of crypto-currencies, explain how they work, and their potential real-world benefits. Finally, it explores the potential challenge to state power posed by this decentralized and technologically enabled currency.

I argue that if the use of Bitcoin were to proliferate, as it likely will, then the inability of the state to either collect revenue from, or regulate commercial activity, poses a threat to the control it currently holds over the international financial system.

Being There Being There considers the evolution of international reporting news by juxtaposing the death of seasoned war corresponded Marie Colvin during the bombing of Homs, Syria with the new digital tools Syrian citizens used to document and stream the war to the world in real time.

In an age of live-streaming, citizen journalism, drone journalism and coming advances in virtual reality, do we even need foreign correspondents? Saving the Saviors Saving the Saviors looks at the impact of collaborative mapping and advances in satellite technology on humanitarian and development agencies.

The world of aid, humanitarianism and development have long been dominated by state-based agencies and large international organizations. But new models are emerging. In the first week following the Haiti earthquake 14, citizens used their cell phones to upload emergency information to a live online crisis map.

How do we know if the information uploaded to a crisis map is real?

Disruptive Power

How do we hold these projects to account, without the oversight that states and institutions once provided? Using examples of disruptive humanitarian actors and recent academic work assessing their impact, this chapter explores how aid and humanitarianism are being transformed from the ground up.

Diplomacy Unbound Diplomacy Unbound explores the emerging practice of digital diplomacy.

Journalism in the digital era

First, it outlines how we valued the efficacy and power of diplomacy before Twitter and Facebook and mesh networks by tracing the notion of diplomatic power. It then argues that we need to view digital diplomacy initiatives in two categories, those that simply expand the practice of public diplomacy into a new medium, and those that seek to fundamentally engage in the digital space, using the tools and capabilities outlined throughout this book.

I argue that when the bounds of diplomacy are extended into influencing not just states, but also digital actors, then they overlap fundamentally with other foreign policy programs and objectives.Each year, we ask some of the smartest people in journalism and digital media what they think is coming in the next 12 months.

Here’s what they had to say. The Digital Revolution, also known as the Third Industrial Revolution, is the shift from mechanical and analogue electronic technology to digital electronics which began anywhere from the late s to the late s with the adoption and proliferation of digital computers and digital record keeping that continues to the present day.

. Google's new dataset search is a game-changer, plus 10 tools for investigative journalism Digital Tools. The Digital Revolution, also known as the Third Industrial Revolution, is the shift from mechanical and analogue electronic technology to digital electronics which began anywhere from the late s to the late s with the adoption and proliferation of digital computers and digital record keeping that continues to the present day.

Implicitly, the term also refers to the sweeping changes. T he influence of social media platforms and technology companies is having a greater effect on American journalism than even the shift from print to digital.

There is a rapid takeover of traditional publishers’ roles by companies including Facebook, Snapchat, Google, and Twitter that shows no sign of slowing, and which raises serious questions over how the costs of journalism . For more than 40 years, Poynter has had one goal: to make journalism better.

From personalized coaching and hands-on seminars, to interactive, online courses, Poynter teaching is designed to.

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